NaNoWriMo Recap (Long Overdue!)

I started a short blog post a week after NaNoWriMo ended, ruminating on a post-partum writing-blitz funk I found myself in. I never finished the post, as the funk rolled into the holidays, followed by a scramble to prepare for a three-month contract away from home, and attempts to squeeze in some promotion for the published novel. I am shocked to return to the post only to discover I wrote the thing two months ago! So without further blah-blah-blah-ing, here are some reflections on my Nano experience.

I took November off to write—something I have never done before officially (unofficially I have refrained from actively seeking new contracts in the interests of spending time with words … but often to my detriment as the gnawing worry of lack of income undermines the ability to sit down and concentrate on a novel). This time I had the luxury of knowing I had work lined up at the end of the month. I treated the November novel month as a contract with myself, determined to write a minimum of four hours a day and aiming at six or eight.

I decided to write a story inspired by a visit to Annapolis several years ago when on visiting one of the historical houses I learned about indentured servants. I wondered what it might take to persuade someone to voluntarily put themselves in complete servitude in exchange for travel to the Americas. Could love be a motivator?

The week before writing officially began, I dedicated my time to putting together character studies and period research. I’ve set the novel in 1740, beginning in London, jumping to New York and Philadelphia, then back to London, over the course of five years. I did not intend to write another novel about crossing the Atlantic, but that seems to have happened. I would have liked to have had more time for research but I ended up working on my last contract right up to late October.

Nano encourages word count, with a winning participant culminating a total 50000 words over the 30 days of November. I managed an average 2500 per day, with my best day writing just shy of 6000 words. I tied the structure of the novel to the calendar days, knowing when I wanted to hit certain plot points. The most difficult points to achieve happened in the middle of the month, and with a week to go I jumped ahead to the third part of the novel. I wrote the final sentence on the last day of November, some time late afternoon or early evening, to great satisfaction. I finished with 74000 words down on (virtual) paper, and a giant hole in the middle of the story. The last sentence? [spoiler alert!]:

“Each of them basked in the promise of a future that neither of them had ever dreamed possible.”

I guess as much abuse as I put my characters through (I’ve learned I like to abuse my heroes), things turn out all right in the end.

My goal now is to fill that giant middle-of-the-story hole and edit the rest of the 74000 word manuscript. I intend to publish each of the three parts electronically through this year, and release a full print version at the end. I’ve been rereading the novel this week as a first step, and am happy to find myself fully engrossed.

Stay tuned next week for what I’m doing to create my “author platform.”

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “NaNoWriMo Recap (Long Overdue!)

  1. Hi there! I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed this blog post of yours… Not just this one but all of them because they are all equally great.

    I should mention that because of how much I loved this post of yours I had to check out your blog and I couldn’t help but follow you because your blog is both amazing and beautiful. I am so happy I came across your blog and found it because I do really love it and I truly can’t wait to read more from you, so keep it up (:

    P.s. This comment is towards all of your blog posts because they are all equally amazing and incredible, keep up the great work (:

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